UK Space Agency launches pioneer communications satellite project in Bicol

Legazpi City—The DSWD Regional Office was selected as the pioneer testing ground for a communications satellite project made possible through the partnership of the Philippine Government and the United Kingdom Space Agency to establish a reliable and stable mobile and data connection within the first 24 hours after disasters.

The said project will be implemented for two years that will officially start this coming April. The DSWD Regional Office that also serves as the Regional Disaster Risk Reduction Management (RDRRM) Deputy on Response Cluster will receive five units of communications satellites which will be installed in its main office and provincial offices. After eight months, four out of the five units will be redistributed to other DSWD regional offices. Inmarsat will donate the said equipment to DSWD once the project ends in 2019.

An initial dialogue was conducted last January 13, 2017 in Legazpi City with the project team from Inmarsat, a British mobile satellite company, and DSWD, the lead agency on disaster response.

During the said dialogue, Disaster Response Assistance and Management Bureau Head Felino Castro said that the Department has been bolstering its efforts to improve its operations systems during disaster response and has reassured that the stewardship of these communication equipment is its prime lookout.

“The facility is valuable to the uninterrupted communication between the Disaster Quick Response Teams (QRT) reporting at the regional office and provincial offices to ensure that affected local government units (LGUs) will receive prompt relief augmentation,” DSWD Regional Director Arnel Garcia said.

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Kalahi-CIDSS aids Typhoon Nina early recovery efforts in Bicol

Aside from relief augmentation and technical assistance to local government units during disaster operations, DSWD will also augment in a form of funding support to all municipalities with existing Kalahi-CIDSS program in line with the early recovery efforts in Bicol to areas damaged by Typhoon Nina.

From 2014 to 2019, Bicol has been allocated 4.1 billion and 2.27 billion of which has been utilized by poor villages for the implementation of the community-driven development (CDD) program or Kapit- Bisig Laban sa Kahirapan-Comprehensive and Integrated Delivery of Social Services (Kalahi-CIDSS).

Qualified municipalities can access their available Kalahi-CIDSS funds waiving the mandatory LGU counterpart for the restoration of basic services and livelihoods in affected villages.

Eligible municipalities must be currently implementing Kalahi-CIDSS and have declared state of calamity supported by Sangguniang Bayan (SB) Resolution.

As of the writing, the Kalahi-CIDSS Regional Project Management Office (RPMO) has the initial list of eligible municipalities which are all subject to the validation of the Sub-Regional Project Management Office (SRPMO), the Kalahi-CIDSS provincial extension office, and approval of the RPMO.

There will be a shift from the standard Kalahi-CIDSS processes and operations into the use of Disaster Response Operations Procedures (DROP) or the Kalahi-CIDSS disaster response modality using CDD.

 

Eligible villages

The funds for the early recovery efforts will be directly downloaded to the villages with the following fixed criteria for targeting disaster-affected areas:

  1. Population of the barangay (using the results of the latest census – 20%
  2. Poverty incidence (to be generated from the DSWD National Household Targeting System for Poverty Reduction (NHTS-PR) – 30%, and;
  3. Extent of damage as measured by the % of damaged HHs (or other available data that allows comparison across all barangays) – 50%.

Moreover, grants are allocated based on severity of damage, thus, barangays will be categorized into three groups:

  1. severely damaged/affected
  2. moderately damaged
  3. least affected

With the limitation of funds, there will be a prioritization and ranking of all villages in a municipality based on the abovementioned criteria. Non-prioritized villages will be referred to their local government unit or other national government agencies. Kalahi-CIDSS will help these municipalities to prepare project proposals and other technical documents to help them access government and non-government aids.

 

Damage Assessment to Kalahi-CIDSS sub-projects

The Kalahi-CIDSS Engineering Unit has been visiting random municipalities and villages in Camarines Sur, Catanduanes and Albay to assess the extent of damages to sub-projects and gather relevant data to enhance the design of future sub-projects.

As of January 5, 2017, there are 2, 806 funded sub-projects under Kalahi-CIDSS from 2002 to present. Based on the initial data gathered last January 11, 2017, there were 118 damaged subprojects.

 

CDD in Bicol

The operations of the community-driven development (CDD) approach expanded into a national scale, which was tried and proven effective by Kalahi-CIDSS. 101 poor municipalities in Bicol are under its expansion from 2014 to 2019 with a total of grant of Php4,497,448,178.

CDD puts power back in the hands of the people by giving them the opportunity to make informed decisions on locally identified options for development and manage resources to implement sub-projects that address needs identified by communities themselves.

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The hard choice that matters

“Bakit? Papayag ba yan na maging volunteer kung walang sahod? (Why? Would he like to volunteer without receiving any form of compensation?)”

That’s how some residents of Brgy. Cawit Proper, Magallanes, Sorsogon would gossip about Randy Manere, 34.

Randy, a college undergraduate, has been working as a Brgy. Secretary since 2011.

At first, he was hesitant to accept the offer to become a volunteer because of his current responsibility, he thought he cannot manage additional work loads.

In 2013, he was convinced by their Brgy. Captain to become a community volunteer because there was nobody who wanted to get involved. He accepted it because it was also an opportunity to help the village to construct the projects they need.

He was right, the tasks of volunteers were complex and exhausting to acclimatize with most specially at the beginning. As a member of the Procurement Team, he did the minutes of their meetings. He rewrote the manuscripts when there were corrections. He is compelled to complete the task despite of painful hands after a long period of writing.

Randy was also tasked for the bidding process legwork requiring him to get to Sorsogon City, an hour away from Magallanes. He admitted that there were sacrifices. He needed to adjust his schedule and finish the tasks within the day because he has no extra money to spare if he returns the next day to Sorsogon City. He would wait for the bidding documents to get fully accomplished and he would immediately retrieve these the same day.

In 2014, he walked about two kilometers to search for potential bidders because his allowance was only sufficient for his roundtrip fare. He cannot afford to buy himself a ride within the city or even purchase a meal leaving his stomach empty until he reached home.

The following year, he even got drenched in the rain and crossed a flood after retrieving the forms to catch the last trip back to Magallanes.

Randy would go home home feeling hungry, tried and wet after a hectic trip for the project their village will construct.

But the worst is yet to come. Some of the residents and even the members of the Barangay council doubted him.

He can still remember what others said to him: “Bakit? Papayag ba yan na maging volunteer kung walang sahod? (Why? Would he like to volunteer without receiving any form of compensation?)”

They accused him of receiving a kickback by increasing the prices to which he vehemently refuted.

He answered them back: Kung may duda kayo sa akin, pwede niyo puntahan at tanungin ang mga suppliers tungkol sa presyo na nilagay nila sa canvass forms at kung may usapan ang supplier at Procurement Team tungkol sa kickback (If you doubt me then you can go and ask the suppliers about the price they have written on the canvass forms and confirm to them about the kickback arrangements between us).”

Later on, he learned to ignore them though it was punitive for him to get wrongfully accused when his main purpose is to perform his part as a volunteer and think of his neighbors’ welfare.

Despite of these, Randy derived strength from other volunteers who believed and trusted him.

“Ano mang unos o problema na hinaharap ko ay aking nalagpasan dahil sa tulong ng kapwa ko volunteers at iba pang tao sa komunidad (I surmounted the problems with the help of my fellow volunteers and others in the community).”

He is grateful of the people who recognized his consistent dedication for the completion of their projects. He compared his colleagues to a “”walis tingting”” because Randy who belonged to a group of volunteers is united to build their community sub-projects.

“Parang sa Kalahi-CIDSS, nagkakaisa ang mga tao para hindi matinag at lalong lumakas ang pagsasama para matapos ng maganda at maayos ang proyekto (Just like in Kalahi-CIDSS, we are indomitable and solid when we work together to complete the project)”

The opportunity he was forced to accept onset was also the window to altruism. Money did not matter. Randy was fulfilled and elated to contribute for his village’s development.

Their drainage canal was repaired and another one was constrcuted wherein PhP600,000.00 was poured in to the Brgy. Cawit Proper. Lamp posts were constructed with a total grant of PhP300,00.00 while the construction of their new evacaution center is underway with an amount of PhP2,165,000.00 from Kalahi-CIDSS.

Kalahi-CIDSS- Kapit- Bisig Laban sa Kahirapan-Comprehensive and Integrated Delivery of Social Services (Kalahi-CIDSS) is a DSWD program that seeks to help alleviate poverty through community-driven development (CDD).

The operations of the community-driven development (CDD) approach expanded into a national scale, which was tried and proven effective by Kalahi-CIDSS. 101 poor municipalities in Bicol are under its expansion from 2014 to 2019 with a total of grant of Php4,497,448,178.

Community-driven development (CDD) puts power back in the hands of the people by giving them the opportunity to make informed decisions on locally identified options for development and manage resources to implement sub-projects that address needs identified by communities themselves.

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DWD strengthens LGU support to Kalahi-CIDSS

Legazpi City— DSWD has been hosting regular provincial forums for the municipal local government units (LGUs) implementing Kalahi-CIDSS to guarantee their full engagement in the completion of ongoing construction of community sub-projects.

Kalahi-CIDSS- Kapit- Bisig Laban sa Kahirapan-Comprehensive and Integrated Delivery of Social Services (Kalahi-CIDSS) is a DSWD program that seeks to help alleviate poverty through community-driven development (CDD).

The operations of the community-driven development (CDD) approach expanded into a national scale, which was tried and proven effective by Kalahi-CIDSS. 101 poor municipalities in Bicol are under its expansion from 2014 to 2019 with a total of grant of Php4,497,448,178.

The schedule of the forum per province is: Camarines Norte-October 11; Camarines Sur-October 12 and October 18; Catanduanes-October 14, 2016; Albay and Sorsogon-October 19, 2016 and Masbate-October 25, 2016.

Through the forum, DSWD would like to ensure that LGU commitments such as local counterpart contribution delivery and technical assistance provision to villages are done. LGU performances and accomplishments are reported, action plans are also crafted, issues and concerns are addressed and good practices are discussed.

The LGUs are vital partners of DSWD on the timely completion of community sub-projects so that poor villages can profit from these. LGUs assist the elected residents who directly manage the implementation of these interventions.

To date, there 1,403 funded community sub-projects, 655 of which are completed while the rest are targeted to be completed at the end of the year.

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Poor solo parent helps village through volunteerism

Even the most destitute member of the community can contribute to its development. For someone who lost a home and a husband, helping others is just normal.

Marites Soquino, 42, a solo parent of Brgy. San Isidro Iraya, Malilipot, Albay was abandoned by her husband five years ago. Their romance ended with five sons and they have been under her care since 2012.

Moreover, Typhoon Glenda destroyed their makeshift house in 2014 and since then, they have been living in a shelter box (tent), an aid they received from a foreign donor.

She reports to work six days a week and takes home a maximum of PhP3,000 a month as a secretary in a direct selling company in Tabaco City, another town next to Malilipot. She also gets an extra profit as a seamstress. Her two children are Pantawid Pamilya beneficiaries who receive a total of PhP2,200 for every two months when all health and education conditions are met.

She said that her children are her inspiration. She values the education of her kids and only wishes them to get a good education.

Her responsibility of raising her five sons was never a hindrance to devote a portion of her time to their village. She was a member of the Kalipunan ng Liping Pilipina (KALIPI), a barangay women’s organization, before receiving a volunteer stint.

“Magtarabangan kita tanganing makatapos kamo,” she told her children.

During a community assembly in 2014, Marites and other residents were elected as community volunteers who will manage the construction of their school buildings. Being the head of the volunteers, her responsibility included the management of several volunteer committees to ensure that they are doing their part. Their group was also obliged with the prompt compliance of documentary requirements to build the school buildings.

She even skipped work despite of salary deduction just to attend all trainings and seminars relative to her responsibility.

Marites’ dedication and passion in building a better community for her children was not extinguished by wrongful accusations and rumors.

“Kapos man kami sa pera, edukasyon an maipapamana namin sa aming mga anak,” she said.

Just like any other government projects, the villagers doubted the completion of their school buildings because there was a discrepancy with the documentary compliance effecting a delayed implementation. Thus, rumors surfaced that Marites and other volunteers took the money for their school buildings.

But she was relentless enough to keep the spirits of her co-volunteers high despite of the tirades and bashings. Marites continued to encourage the residents to participate. She would candidly respond to queries about their community project as part of transparency.

As a graduate of two-year course, her leadership skills help the community volunteers appreciate the importance of the project in their barangay.

Their elementary school and high school has one school building each. The construction started last June 6, 2016 and is almost complete. The said project has a total cost of PhP4,126,249.92 from Kalahi-CIDSS- Kapit- Bisig Laban sa Kahirapan-Comprehensive and Integrated Delivery of Social Services (Kalahi-CIDSS) is a DSWD program that seeks to help alleviate poverty through community-driven development (CDD).

Kristen Rozen, the project coordinator of the school building in Malilipot, described Marites as a selfless volunteer despite of her poor living conditions, she performs all her functions without expecting anything in return.

She never complained about poverty. She focused on how she can reach her goals for her family and community. She never lost hope when everything turned low. Her strength catapulted her to become a fighter who never surrenders.

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DSWD readies LGUs for the conduct sustainability evaluation of completed Kalahi-CIDSS projects

DSWD conducted the first batch of the Sustainability Evaluation Orientation for the local government units (LGUs) last September 13-15 at Ninong’s Hotel, Legazpi City.

Lectures and discussions on sub-projects’ sustainability were presented during the training. There was an on-site application of sustainability evaluation and actual administration of sustainability evaluation tool on the identified sub-projects.

The next batch will be trained on September 21-23 in Naga City. The activity was participated in by LGU officials from municipalities that completed community-identified sub-projects implemented under the Kapit-Bisig Laban sa Kahirapan-Comprehensive and Integrated Delivery of Social Services (Kalahi-CIDSS), a DSWD program that seeks to help alleviate poverty through community-driven development (CDD).

As of September 1, 2016, There are 517 completed out of 1,381 sub-projects under Kalahi-CIDSS Cycle 1 (2014-2015). The remaining sub-projects are expected to be completed by the end of this month.

In Kalahi-CIDSS, sustainability evaluation uses a survey tool that includes indicators that serve as basis of evaluating the functionality of completed sub-projects in terms of its organizational/institutional component, financial management system, and physical-technical, operation and maintenance condition. It also assesses impacts and benefits generated from the sub-project.

The LGUs are expected to administer the sustainability evaluation through the formation of the Multi-Stakeholders Inspectorate Team (MSIT). The MSIT is formed in every municipality covered by KalahI-CIDSS which include the department heads and local officials with the assistance of the DSWD technical staff.

“Sustainability evaluation orientation for LGUs is essential because LGUs will play a crucial role in its conduct this December,” DSWD Dir. Arnel Garcia said.

During the simulation of Sustainability Evaluation in Guinobatan, Albay last September 14, 2016, Mayor Ann Ongjoco said that the LGU is committed to ensure that communities will sustain their sub-projects.

“Aalagaan namin ang mga proyekto ng Kalahi-CIDSS. Gagawin namin na mandatory through an executive order na isabay sa barangay development funds ang allocation para sa operations and maintenance ng kanilang proyekto,” Ongjoco said.

The operations of the CDD approach expanded into a national scale, which was tried and proven effective by Kalahi-CIDSS. 101 poor municipalities in Bicol are under its expansion from 2014 to 2019 with a total of grant of Php4,497,448,178.

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DSWD foreign partner checks Kalahi-CIDSS in Bicol

 

DSWD foreign partner checks Kalahi-CIDSS in Bicol

Community Consultation with  the women laborers, community volunteers and ADB Gender Specialist Yukiko Ito at Brgy. San Roque, Bulusan, Sorsogon last August 19, 2016.

Four villages in Sorsogon were visited by the team of DSWD’s development partner to review the environment and social safeguards aspect of the Kapit-Bisig Laban sa Kahirapan-Comprehensive and Integrated Delivery of Social Services (Kalahi-CIDSS) during the two-day monitoring visit last August 18-19, 2016.

The team of Asian Development Bank (ADB), one of the development partners of Kalahi-CIDSS, checked on the status of community-proposed sub-projects in Donsol and Bulusan to ensure that policies on environmental and social safeguards assessment are met and all subprojects undertaken by the community are environmentally and socially sound and sustainable. These community sub-projects must have minimal environmental and social impacts through the enforcement of the Environmental and Social Management Framework (ESMF).

The completed three-classroom school building in Brgy. Tres Marias amounting to PhP2,633,684 and the ongoing construction of flood mitigation in Brgy. Gimagaan with a total cost of PhP2,007,646 were visited in Donsol last August 18.

Brgy. Dapdap and Brgy. San Raque were also monitored in Bulusan the next day with the ongoing construction of seawall with a cost of Php3,324,355 and completed evacuation center 4,495,000, respectively.

The ADB team is headed by Joel Mangahas, the Mission Leader/Senior Social Sector Specialist with Social Development Specialist Yukiko Ito, Technical Assistance Coordinator/Consultant Rowena Mantaring, Procurement Specialist Alice Tiongson, Capacity Development Consultant Romulo Romero and Community Infrastructure Specialist Roger Calfoforo.

The ADB team was also joined by the DSWD Project Management Team for Kalahi-CIDSS headed by Cicero Aguilar from the National Office and Irene Malong from the Regional Project Management Office who exchanged dialogues with the LGU officials and the community residents.

In the community, they had community consultations with the barangay officials and the Barangay Sub-Project Management Committee (BSPMC), the overall management committee formed for the Kalahi-CIDSS implementation. They were divided in three groups where they separately discussed social safeguards for the first group, gender mainstreaming for the second and financial management, procurement and infrastructure for the third.

“We hope to address the issues and findings raised during our visit with the inputs from the community to improve the implementation,” Mangahas said.

Ito noted that 18% of women are participating in paid labor and must increase this 20 to 30 percent before the compact with ADB ends in 2017. Morales also emphasized that the community must ensure proper document filing system for easy audit and should train women in welding, plumbing and other non-traditional jobs to provide employment opportunity for women even outside Kalahi-CIDSS construction engagement. Mantaring said that the Environmental and Social Management Plan (ESMP) form will be simplified and the project staff should emphasize the use of this form to the communities. Calfoforo commended DSWD Region V for the excellent implementation of Kalahi-CIDSS.

Moreover, the field visit aims to look more deeply into the implementation of Kalahi-CIDSS Yolanda-affected communities in accordance with the ADB requirements, particularly social safeguards and gender mainstreaming.  It will review the (i) compliance of subprojects with the ADB’s Safeguards Policy Statement and any outstanding safeguards issues from previous mission, and propose measures to resolve these; (ii) implementation status of the gender action plan, and identify any potential constraints and facilitating factors to achieving the ongoing actions and targets; (iii) financial management and procurement particularly at the community level; (iv) technical aspects of subprojects; and (v) capacity building in line with ongoing efforts to establish continuing professional development program for KC-NCDDP staff and related interventions.  The field visit will follow up the EA on the agreements during the midterm review mission.  The findings and agreements will be summarized and incorporated in the memorandum of understanding (MOU) that will be prepared for the joint ADB-World Bank mission in October 2016.

On 13 December 2013, the Asian Development Bank (ADB) approved L3100-PHI: an emergency assistance loan to the Government of the Philippines to support the implementation of the government’s Kalahi-CIDSS by restoring basic social services and rebuilding communities affected by typhoon Yolanda.   The project became effective on 10 June 2014. Kalahi-CIDSS has an estimated cost of $1.132 billion, of which the government finances $270 million (24%), while ADB and the World Bank (WB) provide $372.1 million (33%) and $479.0 million (42%), respectively, and the Government of Australia provides a grant of $11.0 million (1%). The Department of Social Welfare and Development is the executing agency (EA) of Kalahi-CIDSS.

 

Kalahi-CIDSS Expansion

Kalahi-CIDSS is supported by the Philippine Development Plan (2011-2016). Its expansion using the CDD approach in the country was approved last 18 January 2013. 101 poor municipalities in Bicol are under its expansion from 2014 to 2019 with a total of grant of Php4,497,448,178.

The development objective of Kalahi-CIDSS is to have barangays/communities of targeted municipalities become empowered to achieve improved access to services and to participate in more inclusive local planning, budgeting, and implementation.

“It will also be aligned into a program to support community-driven post-disaster response and development in Typhoon Yolanda-affected municipalities within provinces covered by Kalahi-CIDSS,” DSWD Dir. Arnel Garcia added.

Moreover, Bicol received a total of Php2,199,377,794.46 from ADB to implement Kalahi-CIDSS in 60 municipalities from 2014 to 2017.

L3100-PHI: KALAHI-CIDSS National Community-Driven Development Project

Terms of Reference for the ADB Field Visit

17-20 August 2016, Sorsogon

L3100-PHI: KALAHI-CIDSS National Community-Driven Development Project

Terms of Reference for the ADB Field Visit

17-20 August 2016, Sorsogon

 

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DSWD encourages continuous LGU support to Community-Driven Development

The DSWD convened local government units (LGUs) during the Kalahi-CIDSS Mid-Year Review, Re-Orientation, and Planning Workshop in Naga City Regent Hotel and Convention Center last July 21-22, 2016.

The first day tackled in-depth Kalahi-CIDSS program orientation, Cycle 1 (2014-2015) implementation status, lessons and challenges, key support needed to complete the implementation, present targets for the succeeding years of implementation. It also served as an activity to strengthen the local chief executives’ commitment to the LGUs’ partnership with DSWD along Kalahi-CIDSS implementation.

The next day focused on the status of LGU support and address undelivered LGU commitments by creating catch-up plans to attain targets.

“LGUs have crucial roles in the Kalahi-CIDSS implementation because our partnership requires their active engagements to deliver their commitments to the project,” DSWD Dir. Arnel Garcia said.

The activity was participated in by the department heads and mayors of LGUs participating in Kalahi-CIDSS.

The LGUs are expected to complement the operations of Kalahi-CIDSS by providing the following:

  • Delivery of local counterpart contribution
  • Logistical support (Office for Kalahi-CIDSS staff, equipments)
  • Functional Municipal Inter-Agency Committee headed by the mayor responsible for the supervision and monitoring of all Kalahi-CIDSS municipal and community activities and assist DSWD workers in community mobilization
  • Complete staff under the Municipal Coordinating Team, the team formed at LGU level who will help DSWD in the implementation

At present, Bicol had already utilized 43% of PhP4,497,448,178 for the construction of 1,351community sub-projects.

Out of the 1,351 community sub-projects, Bicol must complete the 1,011 ongoing community sub-projects from August to October under the 2014-2015 implementation (Cycle 1). For Cycle 2 (2015-2016), community sub-projects must be completed by September 2017.

The Kapit- Bisig Laban sa Kahirapan-Comprehensive and Integrated Delivery of Social Services (Kalahi-CIDSS) is a DSWD program that seeks to help alleviate poverty through community-driven development (CDD).

The operations of the community-driven development (CDD) approach expanded into a national scale, which was tried and proven effective by Kalahi-CIDSS. 101 poor municipalities in Bicol are under its expansion from 2014 to 2019 with a total of grant of PhP4,497,448,178.

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